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SILIC Self-Cleaning Shirt

By: on December 31, 2013
Discontinued

Hydrophobic. Seems like it would mean afraid of water, doesn't it? Well it does. But in this case, the hydrophobia is a good thing, not a buzzkill like it is when someone invites me and my friend Cornelius to go windsurfing and we have to say no because Cornelius never learned how to swim and I have avoided all bodies of water ever since I got attacked by that jellyfish. The SILIC hydrophobic shirt isn't so much scared of liquid submersion as it is a trained repellent of the second state of matter. Similar to Liquipel and NeverWet, SILIC resists liquid (and therefore stain) absorption, proving itself to be a sort of self-cleaning T-Shirt.

Check out the 30-second featured video to witness SILIC rejecting pour after pour of rainbow-colored sodie and Yoohoo, and the longer supplemental video to hear its creator, Aamir Patel, discuss the specifics of the shirt's technology and design.

SILIC features include:

  • Hydrophobic Fabric. This nanotechnology bonds billions of silica particles to SILIC fibers on a microscopic level, forming a layer of air between them and any potential runny or oozy intruders. Instead of absorbing water-based liquids, the fiber barriers will press their particles into 150-degree spheres that roll right off. The technique is said to work for sweat as well as spilled drinks.

  • Design. It's simple. Fitted. Supposedly "enhances any figure's torso," but, having seen many a torso in my day, I highly doubt that. I think the SILIC looks like your average dude's undershirt. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

  • Does Not Cause Cancer. I guess some hydrophobic nanotechnology does. SILIC says the kind it uses doesn't. So...cool. Clean and cancer-free. I'd like to be both of those things.

  • Enjoys Washing Machine. Some hydrophobic treatments wash away after one cycle. How is that possible?! What happened to all those fibers 'roided out with billions of silica particles?! Shouldn't Rule #1 of all hydrophobic nanotechnology be, "Make it so it doesn't wash off with water"? Anyway, whatever alterations SILICA has made to its process address this conundrum for up to 80 hand and machine washing cycles.

Pledge for your own SILIC to put to the test on Kickstarter through January 26, 2014.

May 2014 Update: SILIC vastly exceeded its crowdfunding goal and is now available for direct purchase through the company's website--follow the link below.