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Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2013
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SteakStones

SteakStones
ADDITIONAL IMAGES & VIDEOS
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SteakStones are really just a way for people who are lazy or lousy cooks to host a dinner party without going to too much trouble or F'ing everything up. That being said, SteakStones still look awesomely rad and radly awesome and also badass. A blazing hot slab of hardened lava and a raw hunk of beef set before me with bowls full of sauces and seasonings and the command, "Go for it"? Well, OK, I guess I could do that. Every day for the rest of my life. My grandma used to have a sage expression for the way I'm pretty sure the SteakStone setup would make me feel: happier than a pig in shit.

Provided no Einstein forgets himself and plants a palm on one, SteakStones seem to be easy and safe for anyone to use. After stone components are heated on the stovetop, in the oven, or on the grill to their recommended temperature (540 to 665 degrees F) they transfer to bamboo holding trays, and then to individuals, for individual sizzling tableside. Like raclette and fondue dining methods, SteakStones encourage a more interactive eating experience, plus decrease the amount of time the meal's host must spend toiling away without socializing in the kitchen.

SteakStones cook all types of meat, seafood, and I guess vegetables, though what a waste of 30 minutes heating in the oven just to throw a few slices of eggplant and a portobello mushroom on one. They come in several layouts, including:

  • Main Set. Bamboo presentation board, a lava stone cooking slab, porcelain plate, stainless steel tray, and 3 shatterproof glass bowls.
  • Steak Plate. Larger, 14" x 7.9" SteakStone that can be used to cook, present, or chop various foods.
  • Sharing Platter. As depicted in the featured photo, larger surface and under-storage area for group cooking and consumption.
Purchase Details: $106.47 - $152.13 from Steakstones »