Gallium Spoon Mold

By: on January 16, 2015
Check It Out

Now that you know about the weird science of gallium, you're probably wondering what the WTF you can do with it once you've scored a nugget. My suggestion: spoon gag. Slightly more sophisticated than "Pull my finger", slightly less hilarious than removing part of the assembly on your friend Cornelius' bedroom door and then setting it back on its hinges such that it falls on him when he opens it, a spoon made of gallium will melt into a pile of liquid metal at surprisingly low temperatures. Even body surface temperature should do it, as liquifying begins at 85.85 degrees F, and a bowl of soup will definitely do it.

WARNING: Should you make and convince someone to use a gallium spoon, thereby successfully getting your jollies as it melts into a silver blob in their bowl of Spaghetti-Os, please don't be mean-spirited enough to let the person eat the Spaghetti-Os. While gallium is non-toxic, it's really not safe for non-prescribed human consumption. And neither are Spaghetti-Os for that matter.

This kit includes everything needed to make a gallium spoon, except the gallium, which you can buy separately here (at least 20 grams are required). In addition to the silicone spoon mold, Rotometals' gallium kit includes: bolts, screws, wing nuts, and washers; acrylic backing plates, a syringe, and a manual with how-tos and tips.

Note: According to Rotometals, gallium is a tricky devil, and attempting spoonify it with chocolate spoon molds will not work because they don't provide the air-tight seal.