The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray

By: on September 09, 2015
The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray
Check It Out

How many actors have not only become icons for multiple roles they've played but also for playing the role of themselves, and also for simply being themselves? And how many have continued working, remained coveted and revered for almost 40 years? I can think of only one*: Bill Murray. Dr. Peter Venkman, all Wes Anderson movies ever, Zombieland, Thrill Murray the coloring book, sage bachelor party crasher--no one has had quite the uniquely illustrious career and life of Bill Murray. At least not according to The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray.

Robert Schnakenberg wrote The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray as A Critical Appreciation of the World's Finest Actor. How does Schnakenberg reach this conclusion? As the blurb says, Bill Murray is "the sort of actor who can do Hamlet and Charlie’s Angels in the same year...and once agreed to voice the part of Garfield because he mistakenly believed it was a Coen brothers film." Apparently, he's not one for managers or agents or mouthpieces other than the one built into his own face either. (Though that's probably how he ended up mouthing off to Jon Arbuckle and shipping Odie to Abu Dhabi.)

The Big Bad Book of Bill Murray is partially a biography of Bill and partially a big, fat, sloppy wet kiss to him. Its 272 pages are filled with anecdotes, quotes, filmographies, and full-color movie stills and behind-the-scenes photography.

*Granted, I don't like to think too hard, so maybe there are more. But even guys like Harrison Ford, who has both Han Solo and Indiana Jones, or Stallone as Rocky and Rambo don't really maintain their pop culture relevance have multiple books made about them as themselves. As Harrison Ford and Sylvester Stallone they're just, like, rich old white guys.