Atlas of Prejudice 2: Chasing Horizons

By: on May 03, 2014
Atlas of Prejudice 2: Chasing Horizons
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Atlas of Prejudice 2: Chasing Horizons is the latest in Bulgarian visual artist Yanko Tsvetkov's Mapping Stereotypes project. The ever-expanding collection includes maps of sardonic--and often thought-provoking, introspective, and inflammatory--views of the world as seen through the eyes of its various constituent factions. As a Jonathan Swift-approved satirist, Tsvetkov spares no one. Of Atlas of Prejudice 2: Chasing Horizons, the author says:

This time around, there's much more to read. I wanted the book to have a backbone, an idea that runs almost continuously through it, like a baseline of a song. I found inspiration for it examining the generational gap between me and my grandmother. The book opens with a description of the world according to her and ends with a map according to a Facebook user. Even though I am in my late thirties and I'm not a huge fan of that particular social network, I consider myself part of the generation it defines.

Nice. So now the nationalities of the world who were previously warring over each other's small-mindedness, misplaced stereotypes, or Tsvetkov's mis-assigned bigotries (just check out the tome of comments in our feature of The World According to Americans) can band together and bitch at Tsvetkov collectively about his pigeon holing of their most precious social network.

My favorite map in the Atlas of Prejudice 2: Chasing Horizons collection though has got to be Europe According to Culinary Horror, a delineation of the most flagrant of edible fouls to emerge from each country in the continent. Duck blood soup, bull's balls, maggot cheese, yum, yum eat 'em up. But the hands-down winners, a tie: Iceland's rotten sharks and Switzerland's Nestle.