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CinvStop Nausea Zapper

By: on April 15, 2017

Now the CinvStop is a wearable I might actually wear. Because while I don't give a 5K about how many steps I've walked or the number or calories I burned playing Sir Match-a-Lot on my phone, I care very much about being able to go SCUBA diving in Cancun this summer without vomiting over the side of the boat and wishing I were dead the whole 2-hour ride out there. And that's the kind of service CinvStop provides. Or rather, zaps into your brain.

For sufferers of seasickness, carsickness, airsickness, morning sickness, and nausea from chemotherapy, the CinvStop wristband places 2 electrodes against your skin that release a low-frequency, virtually unnoticeable pulse able to interrupt nerve signals of nausea on their way from your brain to your stomach.

The CinvStop's "zap" through your wrist targets the vagus nerve signals, adjusting them such that they don't communicate the feeling of nausea between the parts of your body responsible for creating it. The pulse also slows the frequency of abnormal gastric peristalsis, or stomach churning.

Zhiqing Ji, Yang Ye, and Hengchong Yu designed the CinvStop nausea zapper, but no word on when, or if, it will be available to the public.