Nomiku "Sous Vide" Immersion Circulator

By: on July 21, 2015
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All the raving, none of the effort. Even though its name alone makes sous vide cooking seem reserved for classically trained French chefs and snobby foodies, the actual process of turning out meats that melt in your mouth and eggs that taste like they were hatched by the Baby Jesus' pet chickens is a no brainer. If you have the equipment, whose costs have always been another reason sous vide cooking has probably earned its restricted, elitist reputation. Nomiku hopes to change both the impression and the accessibility of the method with its sous vide-emulating immersion circulator.

Nomiku is a 16" arm that clips to the side of a pot or other water-filled vessel and heats and circulates the water until it slowly--very slowly--cooks the foods inside. Like other sous vide cookers, Nomiku ingredients should be placed in sealed bags that have had all air removed, but unlike the super expensive versions, the bags don't need to be a special type or brand, and they don't need a special machine to vacuum seal them. Ziplocs and a good press of the hands will do fine. (Note that today's food-safe plastic bags are plasticizer-free, and so won't leech chemicals into your food during the cooking process. Just verify you are purchasing a brand that is food-safe to 100 degrees C, as well as one that is not organic, plant-based, or reusable.)

Once Nomiku and your ingredients are in place, the immersion circulation cooking process is completely hands-off and virtually foolproof. And even though Nomiku temperatures rarely rise above 70 degrees C, the circulator can convert and cook nearly any traditional recipe to its personal low-heat, slow-cooking style. The company recommends using it to prepare anything from easily overcooked items such as beef and fish, to perfectly tenderized vegetables. The waterbathing is not suitable for leaf greens, pastas, or baking.